Punjabi-Pashtun and Pashtun-Punjabi Racism and Hatred in Pakistan

Pre-pre-script: The comments on this article were quite phenomenal, many of them reiterating my point. To read them, please click here (scroll a little down on the page to view them).

Pre-script: I realize I’m using “Pukhtun” and “Pashtun” interchangeably – because they are the same thing. I don’t use “Pathan” because many Pashtuns mind that name and see it as a distortion of the original “Pashtun/Pukhtun.”

This is going to be tough to read for those Pukhtuns who are in denial of the fact that the mockery, the racism, the bigotry of the Punjabis against Pashtuns goes both ways: it’s not just Punjabis alone who mock Pukhtuns; Pukhtuns mock Punjabis constantly as well – they just do it in different ways. It’ll also be a tough read for Punjabis and other non-Pashtun Pakistanis who think “Pathan” jokes are funny or who deny the reality of institutional racism against Pashtuns in Pakistan.

One of the most popular “discussions” that takes place on Twitter (prolly right after the whole “NO, STUPID! A Pukhtun cannot be a Pakistani! There’s no such thing as a Pakistani Pashtun!” Or asking Pashtuns, “Do you consider yourself Afghan or Pakistani?”) is how vicious Punjabis are for mocking Pashtuns. It is true, it is very much true that Punjabis mock Pukhtuns constantly — and not just in the privacy of their homes but also in the media and on national television. But Pukhtuns mock Punjabis all the time just as badly but in more intimate spaces.

And when Pashtuns are talking about the hatred of Punjabis for us, you’re not allowed to step in and say, “Agreed – Punjabis are racist against Pashtuns, and their ‘Pathan Jokes’ need to come to an end, and they mock Pashtuns all the time. BUT it’s also true that Pashtuns, too, mock Punjabis all the time.” If you do say that, you’ll get things like what I and a few others I know get when we do this. The initiators of the discussions say what amounts to something like: “You’re a traitor for siding with the Punjabis! Pashtuns don’t mock Punjabis. We’re decent, honorable people.” Here’s the most recent example (Twitter). The bottom line of this discussion was that “No, what Pashtuns say about Punjabis isn’t mockery; we’re just joking. But what they say about us is wrong, it’s dishonorable,” etc., etc. They won’t admit that we do a lot more than just joke about Punjabis, but they’re ready to point out that Punjabis are always mocking us and that needs to stop.

Point being that if you acknowledge that Pashtuns mock Punjabis, too, and that BOTH Pashtuns and Punjabis are wrong in doing this, you’re accused of agreeing with the Punjabis, of supporting what Punjabis say about us.

Why am I writing about this? Sure, I enjoy being the devil’s advocate and I like to intentionally disagree with people because that forces me to be more educated about my opinions and the topic in question, but it also pushes the other person to be able to defend her/his opinion more strongly and to be able to respond to the opposing perspective more intelligently. Not every opinion needs to be defended, but when it’s something like the current topic in question, the opinion-holder does need to be challenged.

Now, let me give a few examples (facts) about the mutual racism, bigotry, hatred, mockery of Pashtun and Punjabis for each other.

How Punjabis Talk about Pashtuns

– “Pathan jokes” are a common thing among Punjabis and other non-Pashtuns throughout Pakistan. You can prolly google them and find many, but I won’t do that. These jokes are heard commonly in the Pakistani media, in talk shows, political discussions, and so on. The most recent of these examples is Javed Ghamedi, considered a scholar by many (most?) Pakistanis, falsely declaring that Taliban’s practice of beheading is “tribal Pashtun culture”! When those considered national “intellectuals” and “scholars” spread such falsehood and hate, you know your nation’s in trouble.

– A friend tells me that Punjabis refer to Pashtuns as “akhrot,” or brain-size walnut – meaning Pashtuns are stupid.

– Another friend tells me that he once got into an argument with an imam of Indian origin in a Chicago mosque because of the imam’s misguided message about Pashtuns as an inherently stupid and uncivilized people. The imam was giving a khutba (sermon) on how to speak to people according to their status and level, and the best example he could use to  convey his point was: “Pathans [Pashtuns] are wild and not too intelligent by nature, so you have to engage them accordingly.”  So our portrayal as a backward, uncivilized, stupid people isn’t perpetrated by Punjabis alone but by many others across South Asia. (The Arabs I’ve met in Jordan, Morocco, and Oman think highly of us, so I don’t think this is a universal presumption about us … except for what Western media has been spreading in recent decades about Afghans as a whole.)

– Throughout Pakistan, also, Pashtuns are frequently presented as abusive, controlling of their women, generally extremely violent, “backward,” obsessed with their “honor,” and so on. It’s also claimed that Pashtuns don’t want their daughters to go to school. This is undoubtedly true for a lot of Pashtun families, but only as much as it’s true for a lot of NON-Pashtun families. (I won’t be lame here and give the example of Malala Yousafzai, though – her case is too unique to be presented as an ordinary Pashtun case.) The reality, however, is that until 2009 when the Taliban banned education on girls in at least Swat, Pakistan, the northwestern province of the Pakistani Pashtuns, Khyber Pashtunkhwa, had the highest rate of females going to school. And personally, all the Pashtuns I know treat their women no better and no worse than the non-Pashtun Muslims I know do.

– In September 2012, I attended a conference that featured and welcomed some of the most prominent and emerging scholars from Pakistan or of Pakistani origin. One of the presenters was an artist who was showcasing and discussing some of her artwork. She had examples from all four provinces and I believe all the major ethnic groups in Pakistan. She had only one example of Pashtuns. Can you guess what that was? You guessed it: something about violence against women! This is the piece she showed:

This art piece is by Ayesha Durrani, a Pashtun artist from Peshawar.

The curator showed this as an example of artwork from the Pashtuns of Pakistan. The artist painted this when she witnessed (or heard about? I forget the details now) the murder of a Pashtun woman in court who wanted to divorce her husband. Her father and uncles or some other male family members murdered her to protect their honor by ensuring that she doesn’t get the divorce.

I’m not saying such tragedies and injustices against women don’t happen among Pashtuns. But the problem, besides the fact that they DO happen, is that these are used to define us. It’s juts like what the Islamophobic western world/media does to Islam and Muslims. It’s not that Muslims never practice misogyny; it’s that that’s not what defines us. And it’s that misogyny isn’t just a mark of the Pashtuns–or of Muslims at large–but of every culture, every religion, every society; it’s simply that the misogyny comes in different forms from different communities.

In other words, then, when an artist takes a story like the above of an honor-killing case among Pashtuns to present as THE artwork from the Pashtun ethnicity of Pakistan, we’ve got a problem. Honor-killing is sadly common throughout ALL of Pakistan, and when one ethnic group is singled without any qualification, it’s unfair and it’s intellectually dishonest on the “scholar’s” part.

How Pashtuns Talk about Punjabis

Pashtuns are not any nicer or more subtle about their mockery of Punjabis.

– For Pashtuns, any group of people in Pakistan who doesn’t speak Pashto or who is not Pashtun is a Punjabi. That means that all the Baloch, the Kashimiri, the Sindhis, and actual Punjabis are all Punjabis to Pashtuns. I’m not kidding – feel free to verify with any Pashtun you know. Sadly, this also means that all the non-Pashtuns, since considered Punjabis, are then hated, feared, otherized, and mocked. Let’s suppose you’re a girl and you get a proposal from a decent Punjabi family. Your parents will go, “WHAT!! No way in HELL are we ever going to stoop to the level of marrying our daughter to a Punjabi! No!” How common/uncommon Pashtun-Punjabi marriages are, I can’t say for sure, but the ones I do know came with a lot of sacrifices. At the very lest, the Pashtun family lost the respect of other Pashtuns for allowing their child to marry into a Punjabi family. But marriage is just one part of it – although I think if you really want to understand how much your community respects or disrespects another community, note their reaction to marriage within that other community. If they embrace it or at least recognize it as acceptable and fair, then all’s well; if not, then you know they have no respect for the community with whom the marriage isn’t respected. This goes for religions too.

– When the Pashtun women I know go to some gathering, one of the things they’re best at is mocking Punjabis. “Ew, those Punjabis – they’re ugly as monkeys. For us Pashtuns, the Punjabis are like the blacks of America.” (I’m quoting verbatim (translated from Pashto) from a recent conversation among a couple of Pukhtun women at my house.)

– Pashtuns use “daal-khor” to refer to Punjabis. Supposedly, Punjabis eat a lot of daal (lentil), and that’s apparently a bad thing, y’all. Even though all Pashtuns I know also eat daal like crazy, my family and relatives included. So we Pashtuns are no less daal-khora, huh. Uh-oh.

– Pashtuns mock the way Punjabis look (Punjabis are generally a little “darker” than Pashtuns, and unfortunately like the rest of the world, “dark” is considered ugly and “white/light” is considered beautiful); we mock the Punjabis’ habits, culture, traditions, and other lifestyle. When a Pashtun girl dresses in a way that doesn’t please her family/parents, they go, “What! Do we look like Punjabis to you?! We’re Pukhtuns! We don’t dress like that.” This dressing style can be anything depending on the family: showing arms (like wearing a sleeveless shirt), wearing a sarree, wearing tight clothing, not wearing a parruney, and so on. The idea is that Punjabis are indecent, be-sharam (shameless), immodest; that their women are “loose” and the men don’t care enough to control them or decide for them what to wear. You get the point.

How the Racism/Bigotry/Mockery is Different and How it’s Similar

Since I know for a fact that the hatred, mockery of each other among Pashtuns and Punjabis is entirely mutual, I should explain why Pashtuns feel more like the victims and are less willing to admit that they, too, are just as bad with their perpetration of racism.

– On the Pashtuns case, it is generally more private. The racism, the mockery takes place more inside intimate spaces like the home. On the Punjabis’ side, however, their mockery of Pashtuns is more public and we witness it on national TV. The portrayal of the Pashtun man as violent, bearded, chewing naswaar (tobacco, snuff), abusing his wife and daughters, being an extremist religious man are all common in Pakistani dramas, for example.

– Pashtuns mock Punjabis in Pashto, Punjabis mock Pashtuns in Urdu. Punjabis don’t know Pashto, but since Pakistan’s national language is Urdu, Pashtuns (and other racial minorities) have to know it and they do know it. So we come to hear and read all these “Pathan jokes” about us in addition to the despicable way we’re talked about in the media. Punjabis, however, don’t have any access to how we speak about them because they don’t know our language. And so, for example, I once went to a Pashtun gathering where a couple of Punjabi women were also invited because the hosts were close to them. One of the hostesses was passing out mithaai (sweets), and as she passed them around, one of the Punjabi women took a couple of the sweets instead of just taking one or just a tiny little piece. So the hostess makes this unpleasant, ugly face and says to the Pashtun women what would be translated as: “Dude, what the hell – these ugly, greedy people! They don’t even know how to pretend to be decent and greedily want to have all the mithais!” Um. Yeah. Because the Punjabis had no idea what was just said about them, they couldn’t react or defend themselves.

So, basically, Punjabi racism against Pashtuns is more institutional and so the Pashtuns feel it more because they have access to it. Pashtun racism against Punjabis is generally less accessible to Punjabis, so the Punjabis don’t feel it as much.

The racism, bigotry, mockery is similar in that: both sides, due to a miserable lack of understanding and knowledge about each other, they both have a false notion of how the other treats its women, for example; or because how the other practices Islam; or how the other conducts marriages and so on. We Pashtuns think the Punjabis are “loose,” indecent, immodest, don’t care about their women, are all prostitutes themselves and sell their daughters around; they think we’re controlling of our women, extremist, and sell our daughters!

But, dude, just because some of the Punjabis we see on TV are bad people or because they dress differently from how we think all women should dress, doesn’t make them less respectable than us, folks!

A Message to Pashtuns:

Stop denying that we’re just as bad as the Punjabis when it comes to hating, stereotyping, judging wrongly and unfairly, and mocking. We’re just as wrong as they are when they mock us, and we need to educate ourselves about them and learn to live in harmony for a better world.

A Message to Punjabis:

Your stereotyping Pashtuns, your mocking us, your hating us, your picking on us seriously is getting out of hand. Educate yourselves about us so you don’t remain ignorant about us and arrogant in your thinking and lifestyle. You’re no better than us – nothing about you is better than us. We’re an honorable and valuable people, and so are you. Your thinking that you’re better is getting you nowhere, and it definitely doesn’t increase your value in our eyes.

To both Punjabis and Pashtuns:

Stop hating each other, goddamnit. Hasn’t history taught you a thing? Love and respect for all is the only way towards peace!

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About Orbala

I want it to rain on my wedding day, pliss.
This entry was posted in I can't believe this needs to be said out loud, Just stop, Pakistan, Pashtuns, social justice, violence in this world and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

114 Responses to Punjabi-Pashtun and Pashtun-Punjabi Racism and Hatred in Pakistan

  1. VoltTackle... says:

    If Pashtuns love Pakistan so much, it makes no sense whatsoever to hate Punjabis…

    For Anti-Pakistani Pashtuns,
    it’s plainly
    it’s plainly how Nazi Germany was to

    Like

  2. VoltTackle... says:

    For Pashtuns who love Pakistan so much, it makes no sense whatsoever to hate Punjabis… Same for Punjabis hating on Pashtuns….. Because IF they LOVE Pakistan, they have to consider each-other as their own people, as their own nationality…. This Pashtun-Punjabi and other sorts of racism hurts Pakistan because it gives a chance to motivate Pashtuns and other minorities to join seperatists movements…. If Pakistanis want to unite their country, they can’t cause this tension… otherwise such races are not considered their own people and will demand their own identity….

    Now What about religious groups like Shia and Sunni or persecution of Christians. Pakistan was made because of Islam, but Wouldn’t it Pakistan split between Shia, Sunnis and Christians?

    For Anti-Pakistani Pashtuns, their hatred againts Punjabis is full blown….

    And what is the Tajik/Dari Persian tension between Pashtuns in AFghanistan?

    Like

  3. Sardar Ali says:

    I AGREE TO ORBALA MORE THAN 100%

    Like

  4. Ali says:

    I think all ethnic groups are guilty of stereotyping each other, it isn’t nice, it isn’t pc but it’s rooted in culture and tribalism

    Some of the racist stereotypes of other ethnic groups are:

    Pashtuns are considered uncivil by some Muhajir people.

    Some Punjabis look down on Muhajirs for being a little darker than them and call them “Hindustani” derogatorily(cause their forefathers are from there), they also think muhajirs are weaker than them.

    Muhajirs consider Punjabis backward,uneducated,violent and misogynistic(I know marriages that ended cause of this stereotyping) and Punjabis with Punjabi accents are considered “paindoos”.

    Sindhi people are considered really cunning and lazy(picture Zardari) and Sindhi men are considered misogynistic towards women, Muhajirs and Punjabis think they’re all gun-totting Waderas(tribal chiefs)

    Some Pashtun people are racist towards Muhajirs, they look down them for physical reasons and also cause they originate in India; there are places in Karachi where Muhajirs can’t go cause they get attacked and the opposite is possibly true.

    Baloch people are stereotyped as lazy,distrustful and tribalistic people who follow their Sardars, a Pashtun friend told me that Baloch are cool but that a Baloch can’t be even trusted with their brothers wife(his words, not mine) . In Karachi people think Baloch people are gangsters and they’re stereotyped as African-looking(they suffer some racism cause of that)

    Baloch people generally hate Punjabis for various political reasons and see themselves as a superior Iranic race being ruled by Ex Hindus.

    Seraikis hate Punjabis and Punjabis consider Seraikis as people that love to fight and seek trouble

    An Afghan friend of mines told me that Kashmiris can’t ever be trusted, they’re cheaters(he said this knowing that i am one), whereas Pashtuns are honorable people who always keep their word, i wasn’t offended i was amused.

    He later went onto to say racist stuff about Hindko people but i didn’t care to remember.

    There’s another ethnic group in Pakistan called the memons and they’re stereotyped as extremely shrewd and stingy people like the jews

    I notice that there’s also intra-ethnic racism among tribes/caste, like a Pashtun said that Khattak people like dancing and a Khattak person said that Yusufzais were traitors to them.

    and that also occurs in other ethnic groups among their tribes and clans

    So the point of boring you with all of these anecdote is that we all stereotype each other and it’s sadly part of human nature

    racism might never end but everybody can grow thick skin and a sense of humor to laugh it off till times change

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Rooted in culture and tribalism? I feel like I needed to stop reading after that. Calling racism/bigotry tribalism is a form of bigotry itself.

      Like

  5. Sumaira Ahmed says:

    Well said Orbala… I am a pathan too and I completely agree with u…. I had the oppurtunity to live in both areas, punjab and KPK. And I’ve seen it happen both ways… I personally experienced it.. Since no one can recognize me as pathan from my accent or face so in Punjab people mocking pathans and then when I would say I am one, they’d be like “OMG”. And similarly in KPK, since I was from Punjab and they’d not recognize me from my accent or face so they’d mock me and when I’d say Hey man I’m pathan they’d be shameful…. So I really feel by heart everything u said…. And I’m being completely neutral in saying that this has to stop if we want to emerge as a great nation…..!!!!!

    Like

    • Khorasan Studios Unlimted says:

      It’s Pashtun, not Pathan 😉 Your not speaking Urdu-Hindi, you are speaking English, so pronounce your ethnicity right…..

      Like

    • orbala says:

      Not all Pashtuns have a problem with being identified as or referring to themselves as Pathan. Let Sumaira refer to herself as Pathan if she wants to, and you and I and anyone else have NO right to tell her otherwise.

      Like

    • Khorasan Studios Unlimted says:

      All right…. let me stop my mess…

      She’s Pathan and she’s just that….

      and i am Afghan, and when i call myself Afghan even though i’m from Pakistan side of durrand line, no one has any right to deny that i’m Afghan cause i wish to identify with Afghanistan as a Pashtun, for the same reason, i cannot Pakistani PAshtuns that are unwilling to join AFG to deny their right of being called Pathans or Pakistani Pashtuns….

      NO one has the right to say i’m not AFghan the same way NO one has a right to say TAjiks, Uzbeks, Hazaras are not Afghan or that she is not Pathan….

      fair deal…………..!

      Like

    • Khorasan Studios Unlimted says:

      I’m not Forcing Pakistani Pashtuns to become seperated from Pakistan and/or rejoin Afghanistan,

      i’m not forcing anyone into any political identity…..

      because i have NO right to force that on anyone….

      Like

    • orbala says:

      It says so much about Pukhtuns’ priorities and politics that we even talk about this. So sad.

      Like

    • SpaceMonkey12345 says:

      It’s funny how most Pakistani Bashing nationalists are male…

      among Pakistani Pashtuns that want independance, 90% are likely to be male..
      cause you’d think it’s a dude thinking about all these racist Pashtun centric comments

      The Pakhtanas that hate and Bash Pakistan are there but west of Durrand line,,,, i’m talking about Pakistani Pashtuns who decide to be Afghan Pashtuns after reading about the Durrand line and Pashtun history, b/c men care more about conspiracy theories than women do… ionno losers that sit on movie maker to make hateful videos againts PAkistan, and Non-Pashtun AFghans are usually men…..

      #Patriarchy

      Like

    • SpaceMonkey12345 says:

      rephrase:

      “have you met a Pakistan-Bashing or non-Pashtun Afghan Bashing Pashtana? especially one from the Pakistani side?”

      Like

  6. Gautama Boddhivasta Sicke-Sixty says:

    I like Orbala, she’s very very brave by clinging to Pakistani identity despite the reactions to anti-Pakistani Pashtuns.

    The more Pakistani-basher’s attack Pakistani pashtuns, Pakistani Pashtuns will love Pakistan more and think Afghanistan-joiners, or Pashtunistan people are lewanai-crazy or idiots…

    If you want to teach Pashtuns history, identity, nationality etc… teach it with love, not through hate or by force…..

    Like write books or open a Pashtun cultural museum or small festival and say this is about Afghanistan or Pakistan Pashtuns equally and make it unbiased to whatever political stance… don’t support any corrupt neo-nazi party

    I hate lunatic Pashtun ethnocentrists! Not just Pakistan bashing, but they hate Tajiks, Uzbeks and Hazaras so much too!

    Though Pashtuns existed for a while , A complete Pashtunistan never existed (well briefly during Hotak and Durrani times). Pashtuns are 5000 years old race, but Pashtunistan or Afghanistan is only 300 years old. Why do they call Mir Wais Hotak or Ahmad Shah Durrani the father’s of Afghanistan? Because AFghanistan is tied with Pashtuns but before that, it was a bunch of governments of central and south asia… It’s a 300 year old nation fighting with Pakistan being 60 years old….

    , Pashtuns have always been divided between multiple countries. In Khushal Khan Khattaks time, Pashtuns were living between the Safavid Iranian and the Mughal Empire, Khushal Baba was like Alama Iqbal for Pashtuns but at that time, most Pashtuns in present day KPK liked the Mughal empire, the same way they like Pakistan today…. Like, okay, we got the Hotaki empire in 1700’s, the first time Afghanistan came to existence, ruling the native land of pashtuns and parts of Iran, but that vanished for 60 years because of the classic Abdali vs Ghilzai feud among Pashtun people….. The Durrani empire came but they pitted againts the Ghilzai’s. How can they call themselves patriotic pashtuns or afghans if they put down the rival Pashtun tribe they had feuds with? Then you have Barakzais fighting with Popalzais, the Sikhs capture Peshawar and etc. etc. Pashtuns always fought themselves and still do today. HATING PAKistani pashtuns by calling them traitors is more fighting in the end of the day…

    I mean, how many Pashtuns want to take a class in Pashtun or Afghanistan history? To read about the adventures of Mir Wais Hotak being forced converted to Shia islam any more important than an Arab conquering sindh?

    Like

    • Gautama Boddhivasta Sicke-Sixty says:

      It’s so hilaraious, PAkistani Bashing Pashtuns are like Muslim extremists except that they are secular and may occasionally attack islam too and can become incredibly racist…

      How muslim extremists will force non-Muslims to become Muslims, but you cannot force someone to become Pashtun has you have to be “born” pashtun, if changing your culture or language wasn’t hard enough!

      but Muslim extremists are better because anyone can become a Muslim regardless of their genetics or blood, and learning a language, culture is much much harder than converting however you cannot change your genetics, physical features or ancestry whatsoever… (but i dont support than at all keep them in mind)

      Like

    • Gautama Boddhivasta Sicke-Sixty says:

      Get these Pashtun centric nitwitz infront of muslim extremists

      Especially among radicilzed Pashtuns who have been Islamically RAdicalized!
      They will pummel Pashtun centrists because extreme nationalism is haram in the eyes of Islam and they will be shot by apostacy…

      Racial supramacy is worse than Islamic Extremism because you cannot change your ethnicity or background whatsoever …. I have more respect for the Taliban than i do for Racist Freak No lifers……

      Like

  7. I got Lemur Eyes says:

    Let me answer what you said on twitter …

    Tajiks, Turks, and other Dari Persians look down on Pashtuns too. It’s because Punjabis and Tajiks have a more developed lifestyle such as more better an organized agricutlure than pashtuns do. Hazaras probably don’t because Pashtuns have oppressed Hazaras for being Shia and Mongolian, though when you mean Hazara as in Hindko people, sure they look down on Pashtuns. Gujjars are South Asians whom also happen to be the nomadic version of North Indians/Pakistanis, because they are considered culturally, linguistically Indian like Other Punjabis and Northern Indians and Pakistanis, but Gujjars these days are settling down and getting with the times…. but Nobody calls Gujjar’s backwards if being nomadic or semi-nomadic made anyone more stupid… or do they?

    Only i suppose Baloch people and a few Kohistanis might not think Pasthsun are backwards because those races might be semi-nomadic too….

    Pashtuns have a nomadic lifestyle, where they generally always go place to place. Like Kochi Pashtuns who are fully Nomadic, but it’s more correct to say most Pashtusn are originally Semi-Nomadic before moving into cities…… Khaarian was used for Hindko people by Pasthuns meaning city dweller, hinting that city life is not a part of Pashtun lifestyle (nomadic Gujjars hate living in cities too i heard). Hindko means Indian in Pashto but Hindkowans don’t like that so they use the new term Hazara, which happens to be the same name of the Persian speaking Mongolian mixed Hazaras…. ,

    Like

    • orbala says:

      This is one of the most useless, most backward, most dumbest, most racist comments I’ve *ever* received on my blog. Take your flawed ideas of Pukhtuns elsewhere, and *never* return here with that attitude.

      Like

    • I got Lemur Eyes says:

      Dear Orbala,

      1. I did not Insult Pasthuns. I said people with Semi-Nomadic life styles are viewed as Backwards by sedentary cultures. The sedentary cultures usually being HAzaras, Uzbeks, Tajiks and Punjabis. The other semi-nomadic or recently nomadic cultures were Baloch-Brahuis, Kohistanis, Kalash etc… Look up Nomadic lifestyles vs Sedentiary lifestyles.
      Kochi Pashtuns are Nomadic Pastorialists, pastorialism means to raise live stock and move through grass patters. Among South Asians, Gujjars are Nomadic pastorialists instead of Pashtuns. Other Pashtuns are semi-nomadic, meaning that they are not as Nomadic as Kochis but live in Rural outskirst. Even fewer Pashtuns would settle down and practice Agriculture in one place. But nowadays, there’s a trend for Pasthusnss to transition to Sedentiary lifestyles like moving into the city. The thing is, urbanized Pashtuns tend to have less emphasis on Pashtunwali than the rual pashtuns. More Pashtuns are rural but urbanization is a trend..

      Look at HAzaras from Hazarajat, their heritage is a large percent mongolian and in mongolia, most of the population are nomadic. So essentialy, they come close to nomadic Gujjars and the Kochis….

      Being Nomadic is NOT backwards, that’s my fault… what i am saying is that Cultures that are usually nomadic are looked down upon by sedentary cultures because people of those cultures have less education than cultures that are involved with farming or city life..

      but this is changing cause Pashtuns and alot of other Nomadic cultures are becoming sedentary or moving into city life….

      Another explaination is mountainous terrain. Cultures that develop in the hilly parts of the world tend to develop in similar fashion. Scottish people, people of Ex-Yugoslavia and albanians, Kurds and Pashtuns are known for being aggressive, for having a revenge-feud system, for keeping their women tight and they are often involved in being divided by artificial borders (like Durand line, Soctland’s independance and partition of yugolsavia), only beacuse the mountainous terrain made the tracts taht say.. so geography affects how a culture may develop. Look up Hill people, how goegraphy can influence the development of a culture….

      so it’s a mix if semi-nomadic life and agriculture societies…

      Hunter-Gatherer lifestyles has been gone in most cultures in central and south asia…..

      Like

  8. I got Lemur Eyes says:

    but Hazaras, when they mixed with persian culture and they became Sedentary settling in one place,….. so they no longer became stayed nomadic but a few might be nomadic…

    Same with Gujjars, alot of them are settling in and becoming urbanized, but i don’t recall exactly how… it’s a cycle and i forgot to count mountanous terrain… cause it’s being an agricultural society mixed with mountains ….

    Like

  9. I got Lemur Eyes says:

    Pashtun and Baloch culture is not equiped with agriculture due to poor soil how Punjabis are able to farm…… only Peshwar Valley had fertile soil but that was predomintanly hindkowan and Pashtuns only made the majority since 1980’s…..

    I dont know geography that non-Pashtun Afghans live in that well so i made a guess …. if Punjabis are farmers, then what about them?

    Like

    • I got Lemur Eyes says:

      same with Kohistan, hilly araes, and also dont forget to count in rainfall… i think kohistan and nurestan rains alot… even Swat…

      Same with Peshwar valley, alot of areas became conquered by Pashtuns, Swat is not Pashtun soil because yusufzais came there in 16th century but haven’t always been there, therefore these Pakistani Bashing idiots can stfu about Peshawar and swat because pashtuns only made the majority of those areas for only a small amount of their history….

      Like

  10. Attock says:

    As a Pakistani Pukhtoon/Pathan, I have never come across an anti-Pakistani Pukhtoon in real life – they only seem to exist online. Can someone tell me which areas they are from as I’m from Northern Pakistan and so are all the Pukhtoons I know.

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Yeah, it’s mostly Pukhtuns in the West, where they get access to more resources on Pakistani history and learn about Pakistan’s role in the destruction of Pukhtun culture, life, history, etc.

      The ones online who live in Pakistan are prolly too afraid to show their real face offline because they prolly feel alone or in danger or something.

      But I do know plenty who live in Peshawar and are hard-core nationalists and are actually active in the (small but important) nationalist struggle in Pakistan.

      Like

    • Mai Kolachi says:

      You’re from Attock, it’s in Punjab so it’s quite different, but I’ve met anti-Pakistan Pashtuns while living in Karachi who were mostly from Waziristzan/FATA or Afghanistan, the ones I got along with were mostly from Mardan,Kohat,Bannu and Quetta, these areas are better integrated and mostly army recruiting areas, so that might explain.

      If you’re non-Pashtun from what i’ve heard you can’t even visit KPK or Quetta, without going undercover, punjabis/hindko people get slaughtered there

      The author says that the anti-Pakistan ones are hiding?I don’t agree, in Karachi there are whole towns where Pashtuns are a majority such as Hub,Sohrab Goth,Pathan colony,Cuty Pahari,Baldia town,Gadap town,Landhi etc and these areas you can’t even fly a Pakistani flag or speak in Urdu/Punjabi/Sindhi without being stared suspiciously, it’s not easy for outsiders to go there without knowing anybody, and polio workers have to be escorted into those towns and this isn’t new, these ethnic tensions have existed since the 50s, there have been many riots in Karachi between different ethnic groups.

      The same things happening in Islamabad, you can find “Pakistan murdabad” written on walls around afghan migrant areas around the city.

      I don’t see any fear; you can find scores of people speaking pashto on the streets of karachi at any given time on any day in most parts of the city, and most us can’t decipher what they’re saying, don’t know if they’re insulting us or cursing pakistan, can’t tell(not that i care).

      The author says that the ones that migrate to the west become anti-Pakistan by getting educated?well most of them were educated before moving to the west and most of them were supporters of ANP/PMAP/PSF long before they left Pakistan, so there’s didn’t radically change; moving doesn’t change much, i know educated retired Pashtun Pak-army officers living outside Pakistan who are still patriotic, so that debunks any theory of that sort, your convictions don’t really change much, it’s rooted in history/family values etc

      Like

    • Afridi says:

      Orbala is right. I grew up in America. I am Afridi. I am a proud pashtun nationalist and it is much easier to find pashtun nationalist in American than in pakistan or even in afghanistan for that matter. It is also definitely easier to find pashtun nationalists in FATA than in peshawar. When you are living in a society that forces you to shove down pakistan nationalism down your throats and are ostracized for being anti-pakistan, I can see why people would not bother to get involved with pashtunistan and/or hide their views.

      There used to be more pashtun nationalist before the wahabis came into the pashtun areas. Wahabism has the simplistic, naive view that any form of nationalism or patriotism is wrong, which helps Pakistan in fighting Balochi and Pashtun separatism and nationalism. Unfortunately, it is very hard for the uneducated in the pashtun areas to see through the hypocritical wahhabism ideology and the mockery it makes of Islam.

      Like

    • Orakzai says:

      “If you’re non-Pashtun from what i’ve heard you can’t even visit KPK or Quetta, without going undercover, punjabis/hindko people get slaughtered there”

      This is where the whole problem starts when an educated lady like you believe and propagate these utterly baseless allegations without actually knowing a single bit of facts sheet. I love karachites as I have some wonderful friends from that part of Pakistan, but unfortunately, despite of having this super ego of being the “most educated”, they dont even bother working on their pragmatism, rather, they would go live with their verdicts as the universal truth.

      “I’ve met anti-Pakistan Pashtuns while living in Karachi who were mostly from Waziristzan/FATA or Afghanistan”

      The only agreeable part in the whole statement is Afghanistan, as people in FATA are still happily married to the state of Pakistan, as they promised to Mr. Jinnah.

      Like

  11. satish says:

    Good.I am happy to know Pashtuns in pakistan are realizing the tyranny of the Punjabi state disguising itself as Pakistan and willing to fight for freedom,.But the experience of bangladesh means it will be a bloody affair.

    But its in the best interests of KPK to disassociate itself from Pakistan .I really do not see
    how punjab can coexist with Sindh,KPk and Balochistan based on the bogus premise that religion can unite ethnicities .Bengalis saw through the game so many years ago and fought along side us in a glorious war.Today Bangladesh is in the QF of the world cup after taking the best decision of their lives all those decades ago. My country would help you anytime you guys want.

    Like

    • Being from Punjab I really couldn’t wish more that Pakistan gets divided. Never in my life had I ever heard anything racist against sindhis, Pashtun, or Urdu Speaking People. In-fact, both my sisters were wedded into pure urdu-speaking families. But being hated for your ethnicity sucks and hurts and makes me solemnly wish that Pakistan breaks up into 4 different states as amicably as possible.

      Like

  12. Pingback: The Privilege of Sexy Talk | Freedom from the Forbidden

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  14. Hyat says:

    Well, orbala I must say this is a well written article. You’re absolutely right there is hatred from both sides but it exists due to insecurity.

    Like

  15. Hyat says:

    But you can’t write neutrally being a complete pakhtun.
    First of all you should know that the pakhtuns are a single nation unlike the Punjabi’s who are random people with different roots who settled in Punjab. Hence they are called Punjabi which means the people of Punjab or people who speak Punjabi. So the Punjabi’s are a diverse people with different genetics.
    Speaking about fair complexion, it is merely small talk. Since I know many Pakhtuns who are dark.
    And more of them are wheatish as well.
    Secondly Pakhtuns consider their modest dressing as part of their culture when they say Pakhtuns dress modestly. But this is not the case for city Pakhtuns. They wear whatever they feel like wearing over here. But when they’re in their tribal areas they wear burqa.
    Yes, It’s true that Pakhtun label Punjabis as besharam which is very sad. Because not all Punjabis are the same. And same is the case with Pakhtuns even their women in cities wear immodest clothes. So we should make sure we’re perfect before we mock anyone. Which is not the case on either sides.

    Like

  16. Pingback: Misogyny Doesn't Come From "Pashtun Culture" | MuslimGirl.netMuslimGirl.net

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  18. anonymous says:

    I enjoyed this piece. I am a punjabi, the real deal, born and punjabi speaking. Some things are just how a community protects itself from incorporating from the other community it lives with, these mechanisms are in place so that they don’t lose what makes them distinct from them. I found the pakhtun’s mockery of punjabis funny, First I am /we are proud to be representing a broader “punjabis” sindhi, baloch, kashmiri, it feels great to be referred to such diverse people with great cultures as “punjabis”. The color difference is there, and punjabis aren’t ashamed of their color, instead they are proud of it, songs like “kala shah kala, mera kala ae sardar” run deep in punjabi culture. Punjabi women are fairer but in scale still a notch down to pakhtun women. Not marrying in punjabis is fine too, they want to preserve their gene pool, that’s fine by us. Sorry I shouldn’t be using us vs you. Pakhtuns don’t let girls study that’s no secret, there is fair percentage versus who do let girls be taught same as boys, pakhtuns are more traditional than punjabis, who have embraced a lot of western outlook, not in minds but at least visually. Many pakhtuns are still following the age old life-style. The numbers of urban pakhtuns to urban punjabis is low. While we shouldn’t exaggerate stats and make facts out of stats, extrapolation is usually fine in statistics, and a technique actually practiced to predict and analyze.
    Some things you don’t know, punjabis joke a lot about pakhtuns, example? “Two pathans were pushing a buffalo up the stairs, I asked what are you doing? them: We have to zeba it, I told do it on ground floor, them: No knife is upstairs”. Some of these are because someone on tv or stage says a thing or two about pakhtuns, and general population then goes crazy with their versions of the joke, because to them the joke by someone popular is validation of sorts.
    Pakhtuns are known to be simple and plain, who are good and large hearted, and this is excluding the pashtunwali.
    Personally I love pakhtuns, I love pakhtun music, pakhtun culture, pakhtun code pushtunwali, general way of life. Not bragging, but I can bet you I have a bigger collection of Gul Panra than you. I was introduced to pakhtun music by Janan song by Hadiqa Kiani and Imran Khan and Pekhawar kho Pekhawar by Imran. I love works of Ghani Khan, Hamza Baba, Rehman Baba, Imranullah Gran, Shakir Zaib. I have listening to Ranra for 4 years, I love Ismail Junaid songs, Rasha Pa Naz Rasha, Qarar, Pakhwa. I listen to Redi Gul by Wali when feeling low. In other words I am a pakhtun in my social circles. My friends describe me as “hailing from them”.

    Like

    • orbala says:

      I don’t appreciate the way you speak of Pukhtuns. Subtle racism and racist attitudes against my people is still racism. Don’t be backward – start living in the 21st century where it’s no longer acceptable to speak of ethnic groups the way you speak of Pukhtuns. Go away.

      Like

    • anonymous says:

      Sorry if I offended you, where did I go wrong? What are you referring to when you say subtle racism? color thing or the joke? Please explain so I can make amends.

      Like

    • orbala says:

      The whole thing. Replace the word “Pukhtun”/”Pathan” with any other racial term like Punjabi, Kashmiri, etc., and then read your statement again. If you still don’t see what’s wrong with it, we’ve a problem, bruh.

      Like

  19. anonymous says:

    Okay now I get what you mean, I can see the subtle racism you were talking about. It does feel offending, the lines ‘don’t let girls study, follow age old traditions’ that makes it sound like pakhtuns are backward or something. I didn’t mean any of it, I just wanted to tell how they were unique, guess letting girls study and be open is a subcontinental problem. Just some have adapted the change a tad bit more than others.

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Good to see you were able to figure out on your own why your comment was racist especially against Pashtuns. That’s not allowed on my blog.

      Like

  20. rosalindawijks says:

    “Punjabi women are fairer but in scale still a notch down to pakhtun women.”

    And this is implicitly racist too, because you first claim Punjabi women are fairer BUT still a notch down. By stating this, you implicitly claim that being “fair” is something better/desireable then being dark or black, and this is offensive to black, brown and dark women, who happen to form the majority of women in the world, including the subcontinent.

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Right?! And I *hate* the use of “fair” for “beautiful”! It has that Victorian touch of someone who’s white is automatically beautiful and “fair” and someone who’s not is automatically ugly and unfair. Fair meaning good, of course.
      I also hate it when people claim that Pashtun women are “more fair” than non-Pashtun women. How do people make such conclusions? I’ve met so many who are darker-skinned, and I’ve met so many non-Pashtun women in Pakistan who are lighter-skinned. What’s with these skin-color-related stereotypes?

      Liked by 1 person

    • rosalindawijks says:

      Full agreement. Beauty comes in many, many forms & manifestations. Beauty can be find in the whitest of white and the blackest of black (Alek Wek!), and everything in between.

      Like

  21. Atif says:

    I am a Punjabi but the biggest inspiration in my life is Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan (1890-1988). Khan was a nonviolent soldier who fought for freedom and justice for more than 70 years. Incredibly, Khan raised a large nonviolent Muslim army to fight British colonial rule from the midst of a proud and largely tribal people, the Pukhtuns. I am inspired by Khan’s selfless service, dedication to truth, and his passionate peace work.

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Glad to hear you recognize that man’s value! He is certainly inspiring.

      Like

    • Atif says:

      Apart from Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan another Pashtun freedom fighter who has truly impressed me is “Bakht Khan”.He was given the title “Saheb-I-Alam Bhadur” by the Emperor Bahdur Shah Zafar due to his extraordinary abilities.
      Bakht Khan never surrendered infront of enemies. Instead he joined rebel forces in Lucknow and Shahjahanpur. In 13 May 1859 he was mortally wounded and died.
      For me Bakht Khan is symbol of resistance against injustice and oppression.
      Being a student of History i came across these great Pashtun leaders who have not only impressed me alot but have changed my way of thinking about life.
      I think such leaders are born rarely in history.
      It’s our real misfortune that we can’t see such selfless and truly inspiring role models in our present times.

      Like

    • Awan says:

      Mr Atif read your own history first and then you would be proud of your own people more than others. Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan never raised any Army ( Violent or Non Violent) to fight with the British. It is a Pure Pure lie. Infact he studied on British Scholarships for your information. Moreover he was Secular. So from where the Islamic Army is coming?. You are one Punjabi that certainly belongs from Central Punjab. You do not know any history and then get impressed by others easily.
      Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan’s family was a part of British run Frontier regions. Infact they enjoyed power by serving the British.
      Also someday Ask the Historians what words he used for the Punjabis and Urdu speakers. He used to call them Wolves. Still you are impressed by a person who used to mock your people. Well and good.

      Like

    • orbala says:

      lol @ this. Yes, Bacha Khan told Gandhi, “you’ve thrown us to the wolves.”

      Like

  22. Gulbazha says:

    I’m from a Gujjar family originally from Pakistan but I live and was born in the UK, but I admire a lot of Pashtun culture, , of course we have stereotypes, my grandma thinks that Pashtuns are violent, but at the same time she goes on too tell me Pashtuns are the most beautiful people in Pakistan and the bravest and that if I’d marry a Pashtun girl, it’d be a blessing from god. I am proud to be from a Punjabi background, but I also love all the ethnicties in Pakistan, each one has there own unique vibe to, for me I love Pashto music and the language, there language sounds very harsh but very beautiful, the Pashtuns from Pakistan are also a bit different to the ones from Afghanistan, though the one thing I can note down from them both is that most of them are very friendly, which of course is different to the stereotypes as them as violent, I don’t believe this is true, but they do have a scary presence here in the UK, well the ones from Afghanistan do. I can’t believe that Pashto and Punjabi etc are from the same country yet I have the hardest time understanding pashto, I understand farsi more then I do of Pashto, it’s a very unique language.

    The white thing etc I just take with a pinch of salt, Pashtun people are famed for there beauty, but that doesn’t mean no one else is in Pakistan, though my dad told me a story (I hope this doesn’t offend anyone), about how once him and his Pashtun friend were working at a shop and his Pashtun friend was very very white, look European, anyways his Pashtun friend started speaking Urdu to my dad, a man bought his son to the shop and saw them talking and said ‘Look son, ghora speaking urdu’, my dad and his friend just burst out laughing

    I’d like to find out more about the ones living in Pakistan, this blog provided me with good information, thank you orbala well written and informative!, take care and peace!!

    Like

  23. Sami says:

    We Punjabis are not dieing to marry Pashtun women. We have plenty of fair skin ladies in Punjab, Pakistan and not all of them are loose. We just want our women to be educated. Anyways, we are Muslims first but please don’t think Punjabi men dream about marrying Pashtun women, that’s not the case. We are grateful for Punjabi ladies.

    Like

    • orbala says:

      LOL. You have plenty of “fair-skinned” ladies and so you’re not dying to marry Pashtun women? Are you serious? What about non-“fair”-skinned Punjabi women?

      What a pathetic, racist, shitty thing to say about women in attempt to comment on which kinds of women (skin color/shade) are worth marrying and which aren’t.

      And oh em geeee @ “not all of them are loose”! What the hell was that?!

      Leave my anti-oppressive & feminist territory–where respect for women is required in order to enter here–and never, ever return here.

      Like

  24. yasir khan says:

    ITS TRUE THAT PASHTUNS AND PUNJABIS ARE RACIST TOWARDS EACH OTHER……AND ITS SIMPLY BECAUSE OF ONE THING THAT PUSHTUNS HAVE A VERLY LONG HISTOTY AND SECONDLY BECAUSE PASHTUNS ARE BEAUTIFUL,LIGHTER IN SKIN, AND BRAVE…..

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Ew. More suggestions that Punjabis are jealous of Pashtuns. Lol @ long history. Ya Allah kya karoon inn insecure logon ke saath. 😒

      Like

  25. Yasir khan says:

    Its true that punjabis are jealous of pashtuns…..whether u accept it r not,,,,,,

    Like

    • orbala says:

      I’ll believe you if you’re a Punjabi and are speaking for yourself. Are you?

      Like

    • orbala says:

      P.S. I think it’s funny that you assume you’re one of the handsome Pukhtuns out there (because not all Pukhtuns are handsome, obviously).

      Like

    • Umair Afxal says:

      lol……yes im jealous…..now happy😀😀😀okkyyy?????
      bcz No one non muslim amoug you….your ansectry from Khalid bin Walid R.a……………..You fought with turkic ghaznavi and ghouri……against indians…….. your pashtunwali is superior than anything else…..you are only true muslims after sahaba… thats why we are jealous

      mere bhai samajdar ho tu smj jaogy

      Like

  26. Yasir khan says:

    I m not a punjabi,,,,,,i m a pukhtoon,,,,,and of coarse no punjabi will tell u that he is jealous of us….but deep down their hearts they know it,,,,,i have lived in karachi and islamabad i know them personally,,Allah has gifted us with good physique and beauty and Alhamdulillah we are handsome,, and they are jealous of us.,,,i m not saying that they are ugly but its human nature that if someone is more handsome and beautiful u have a little jealousy towards him…whenever i go to a forum like this they talk against us ,,,and i see no other reason of this hatred other than this…,,,,,

    Like

    • orbala says:

      ?! Are you serious?! They say bad things about us, and you can’t think of any other reason they do that than their supposed jealousy of you because you think you belong to a race considered beautiful? (Every race thinks it’s beautiful and great and heroic, btw!). Just because you don’t understand how prejudice works doesn’t mean you get to attribute it to jealousy. Instead of reading about how such racism works, you decide to be an arrogant bigot and claim it’s because they’re jealous of you. I’m dying laughing here! You’d think you’ve so much as a race than other races will be jealous of you … That’s so ignorant. God be with you.

      Also, it’s Ramadhan and you’re still so full of hate towards others. Shaitaan is supposed to be locked up, so he’s not even influencing you. Has hatred and bigotry become so natural to you you do it so comfortably in Ramadhan too? Toba.

      You are a disgraceful and racist prick. You’re not blessed with any more beauty and physique than any other race is – beauty is a subjective term. Feel free to think so arrogantly but calling a race of people ugly is an extremely ugly thing to do. Now you know who’s ACTUALLY ugly – and it’s not the Punjabis.
      Again, if you’re not Punjabi, don’t speak for them. You are not welcome here anymore. No human full of hate is. This is feminist territory and I demand full respect for all people.

      Like

    • I studied in Karachi for 6 long years. My roommates were Punjabi. There era one classmate who was afflicted with acne otherwise he looked no different than ant pukhtun in Mardan or malakand. One was from Multan and the other was from Sialkot. The one from Multan was jealous of me not because of my looks but because of my grades. There are dark pukhtuns and dark punjabies. Whiteness does not confer superiority on anyone. I had 9 females in our MSC class. Some were fair, done a little darker but each one was attractive. Beautiful and handsome people are in every race. So you think people are jealous of you because you think you are handsome, you are sadly mistaken. I have met handsome pukhtuns, ugly pukhtuns, dark or darker pukhtuns and fair pukhtuns. The same is true of punjabies. My father was fair, my sisters are all fair and my brothers are fair too, except myself. They called me torkoney. But believe me my wife thinks I am handsome and my children think that too. Just to say that nobody is jealous of you if you are a shady white. My own preference is not pale white but attractive person, fair or dark, does not matter. You must be living in a dream world. Get up and smell the coffee.

      Like

  27. Afridi says:

    Salomwalikom

    I agree with you on the point that racism comes from both pashtuns and punjabis. On an individualistic level, all members of a race whether they are part of the majority or minority can be racist against one another.

    “So, basically, Punjabi racism against Pashtuns is more institutional and so the Pashtuns feel it more because they have access to it. Pashtun racism against Punjabis is generally less accessible to Punjabis, so the Punjabis don’t feel it as much.”

    At a collectivistic level, the dominant group with power in a society are the only ones that can permeate society with their racist attitudes because of their influence. Punjabis have used their power as the majority to establish their behavior and culture as the norm. Your examples of institutionalized racism prove my point where society at large deems it okay to mock pashtuns and pashtun culture.

    “Stop denying that we’re just as bad as the Punjabis when it comes to hating, stereotyping, judging wrongly and unfairly, and mocking. We’re just as wrong as they are when they mock us, and we need to educate ourselves about them and learn to live in harmony for a better world.”

    The implications of racism at a collectivistic standpoint are much more severe than racism at an individualistic standpoint. In heterogeneous societies, the dominant group in society often have a higher standard of living than the minority groups, and the differences in standard of living between pashtuns and punjabis fits into this trend. Furthermore, any military action in FATA, no matter how cruel or unjust, is seen as justifiable by the media, the public and politicians because it is being done against the savage backward gun loving pashtuns. The same situation is currently happening in Burma where persecution and killing of Rohingya muslims in Burma is acceptable by the majority because the Rohingya are “less human.” Same situation with the US invasion of Iraq. The racist attitudes towards muslims by the majority of the american population made it easier for the US to invade and carry out any military action against Iraq. All forms of racism should be condemned, however, some forms of racism are more powerful than others.

    In a society, the majority that is in power has a greater responsibility to be conscious and aware of their actions because of the greater power that they posses in influencing society at large.

    Like

  28. TrueMuslim says:

    Hey Orbala, first of all, why on Earth do Punjabis mock Pashtuns? Even though I am a Punjabi, I never thought of it, and never even knew that!
    But we all are Pakistanis (Punjabis, Sindis, Balochis, Pashtuns/Pakhtuns,etc.), so what’s the use of mocking? We all are together one.
    Well, once when I saw Pashtuns and Pathans, I noticed that they all do have something in common. They are sooo fair white you know “chitay goray!!” Probably the most fairest people in Pakistan.They’re also tall and those light coloured eyes! Oh my God! Most of all they are very adorable. Especially pashtun kids!! Aren’t Pashtun and Pathan the same thing?
    As Pakistan has 4 provinces, so somewhat their cultures are a bit different from each other. So that’s true. Ex: Pashtuns have different styles of dresses, food etc. Pathans and Pashtuns, both are very kind. Some Afghans which live in Pakistan look a lot like Pashtuns and Pathans.
    Hmm, really damn cool!! By the way, what’s KPK, PMAP, ANP, PSF? Sorry, but I’m not that good in short forms.
    Thanks, May Allah bless you!
    Best wishes… ❤

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Lots of people assume all Pukhtuns are white or have light-colored eyes. I’m a Pukhtun, and hardly anyone in my family or relatives has those eyes, and few ppl can tell any difference between a Pukhtun and a non-Pukhtun (including Arabs)… I think even “well-meaning” distinctions like “Pathans are tall and fair” are harmful in the long run. Height and skin complexion and attitudes are something that always vary in each community and ethnic group so generalizations aren’t fair. For example, my dad and most uncles aren’t tall at all – def much shorter than many Punjabi men I know. My own skin complexion is such that I resemble my Sindhi and some Punjabi friends, so so much for whiteness!

      Yes, Pashtun = Pukhtun = Afghan = Pathan; most of us don’t like being referred to as Pathan, though.

      Kpk = Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, the new name of the NWFP province as of 2010.
      PMAP: Pukhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party, a Democratic Pashtun political party in Pakistan.
      ANP: Awami National Party.
      PSF can stand for multiple things, including Pakhtun Students Federation.

      God bless you, too! 🙂

      Like

    • Aleem Khan says:

      Thanks brother, I hope and pray that Pakistan overcomes all obstacles and is on the path to progress as an Islamic nation. I am a Pakistani Pakhtoon from Bajaur but am pursuing my higher education in Karachi. Regarding Pashtun being all white with blonde hairs and coloured eyes, it is a stereotype. I am of very brown complexion and at my University, my friends usually pull my leg saying that i am not a Real Pathan because of my brown skin tone. Actually most pashtuns are not white with coloured eyes, most pashtuns have a kind of tanned/olive/light brownish complexion with black hair, black eyes. Yes the facial cut of pashtuns is such that i can recognize a pashtun from far off irrespective of his colour, but this is also not the case many times since there are many other people like hazaras, chitralis, gilgitis, etc who can easily be mistaken to be pashtuns and there are quiet of few among pashtuns who would pass in Punjab and Sindh, i being one of them. And yes there are a fair share of pashtuns who are snow white with coloured eyes as well. So there are lot of variations among us as a people.

      Like

  29. Dear Orbala , the thing I noticed in Punjabis are that they consider themselves superior, intelligent, and more worthy than all of the other castes in the country. The racism they show is not only for pashtuns but also for saraiki and other speakers. I lived in Lahore for 5 years and your article, frankly speaking doesn’t depict the whole picture. If you want to see the real picture than please visit and live in lahore, multan etc type cities. These people don’t consider other races as human beings. We pashtuns do jokes and these jokes are in limits and very few almost non existent, but they have brought the mockery to another level. You are blaming pashtuns that they are racist or mock punjabis? Did pashtuns mocked punjabis on television or media or print publications ? In your daily tv shows like khabar naak, stage dramas, local tv dramas, movies, advertisements etc you will only see the funny pashtun who will also be presented as a joker in front of the audience. The thing is that this race doesn’t have moral values to respect another race. Take another example of Islamabad where centaurus banned Pindi boys and you will be surprised that only Islamabadians are allowed, why ? because in islamabad the majority is punjabis and pindians are potoharis. If this racism is only for pashtuns then why this racism is for potoharis. The thing is that punjabis don’t have a sense , they are the stupidest and low level creatures who have lower mentality for other races, they can’t be superior if they think or mock some one else.

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Another Pashtun telling me about how “yeah, okay, maybe we’re racist, too, but Punjabis are totally the worst!” Got it.

      Like

    • Awan says:

      My friend I am a Potohari and we are called Potohari Punjabis. What type of stupid argument is that in Islamabad Punjabis live so they banned Pindi boys ( Potoharis). Potohar is the whole of North Punjab. Potohar is a region of Punjab. So Punjabis banning Punjabis?. I have never met anyone who never associate themselves with Punjabi identity in Potohar. Only those who live across the Attock bridge suddenly change their identity and their are some reasons for it. Update your knowledge kindly.

      Learn something about this region and then comment. Also do you know Islamabad was the part of Punjab before one general annexed it into Federal Territory. So Punjabis are like original residents of Islamabad. They are not settlers of any kind there.

      Also you are complaining about Racism and then you are calling them “Low Level Creatures” and people with “Lower mentality” in the last three sentences. After such type of language your complain of racism is infact Null and Void.

      Like

  30. outlaw says:

    if you have the guts them approve my previous post on here!

    Like

    • orbala says:

      You’re so full of hate, Outlaw, aren’t you? You know, to be honest with you, I’ve never really known anyone who’s that full of hate. What’s it like? How do you go to sleep at night with that much rage and hate? Doesn’t it feel burdensome? I mean, how do you … how do you do it, you know? If you believe in God, I pray that God bless with you with happiness and peace and lots of self-love so that you don’t go around hating other people. If you don’t believe in God, I wish you peace, love, and security – and kindness – that you can spread around. Or, actually, you don’t have to spread it around; I just wish you enough at least for yourself for now.

      As you may have heard, it’s Eid these days (yesterday, today, and tomorrow), and I’d like to wish you a wonderful one if you’re Muslim and celebrate it! If not, I wish you a happy, happy lifetime!

      Peace ❤

      Like

  31. Mohit Gupta says:

    Hi Orbala,

    I am an Indian. Nice to stumble upon here. I was searching about Pathans and landed here. Yours is a interesting Blog. You sound like an amazing person. I am aslo fed up of subcontinent about skin color.

    I will read more of you in coming days.

    Happy Eid.

    Like

  32. Khan says:

    Hello orbala ,I advice to wrote you’re own book. I can see the hard work u put into writing this article. It’s very interesting the way u wrote it . Even the most uninterested person in reading will read it. great blog looks like you have done detail research on both sides. As a pukhtoon I can say that pukhtoons are not bad people but bad and good is in every society. I have met punjabi who are very good people and I have also met punjabis who aren’t. An eg I recently went to a public chat room there were few punjabis there , I went with a name pukhtoon before that I would usually went there with my real name, the difference I saw that people there would treat me differently , most people won’t talk to me before that many people would talk to me with my real name. Many people can take from that the stereotypes agaistPashtun is still present . In my view and many people also not only punjabis but this stereotyping is not only done by punjabis but Urdu speaking ( mahajir) Sindhis ,. In you’re article I may disagree with one thing u told that Pashtun see every non Pashtuns as punjabi which not in my experience true. In you’re article you should have also differentiate between educate Pashtun , punjabis and non educated Pashtuns and punjabis views on each other . In Pakistan army Pashtun and punjabis go hand to hand with each other.and are very loyale to their country. I can’t see in history where punjabis and Pashtuns were against each other in wars . The second name of Pashtun is honour no one can’t take this honour from them. People just see pashtoon honour that they kill innocent people which isn’t true, I will give u an example of a true pashtoon. honour. In Afghanistan in 2005 American navy seal these are special commandos of American military . Went to the kunar province of afganistant in a mission to capture a Taliban commander. But unfortunately Taliban knew about that and they went after tafter about a dozen or more American seal commadoes which were in that mission. Taliban killed about all of those American soldiers , only one soldier was left who ran from that spot and was lost in the mountains of Kunar province. For many days he walked in those mountains but suddenly collapsed and was half conscious and and half unconscious. His luck was that he was seen by a few afghan villagers of a local village. They went and told the head of that village name( Gulab khan) About that soldier. He himself went after him. When gulag khan reached there with a few more people of that village , he saw that soldier in extremely wounded, injured, Not able to carry himself, laying on the ground In the wilderness . Gulab khan went ann forward his hand to help the soldier. After seeing gulab khan coming towards him the soldier was scared because he didn’t knew if that person coming towards him is the person if Taliban . That soldier had one single hand grenade left in his pocket , he threaten gulab khan not to come forward or he wil take out the pin of grenade and kill himself as well as gulag khan . Gulab khan saw his life in danger but still he tried to convince the soldier that he’s nit with the Taliban. After struggling many hours gulag khan convinced the soldier and took him to his village . There he was given first aid, shelter , food. Gulab khan told him that it will take time it inform the American military base in Afghanistan about you and we can hope that they come In search for you which will be a better option. In the mean time agents of Taliban was informed about that soldier . Taliban came after him in that village and emphasis to meet the leader of that village . Gulab khan memetic with them . They told gulab khan it give that soldier to them or otherwise we will kill him and his family . But gulab khan refused and said it’s against PUKHTUN WALI in English puktun wali is the code of honour of Pakhtuns ..gulab khan said that it’s against pukhtun wali that if a guest comes to you I trouble and his enemies wants to kill him. The person who he comes for help . Will help him and if necessary fight for him against his enemies to save his life if it means risking his own life. In my view It may sound stupid to some people fighting for someone’s life who u don’t even know yet or is no advantage to you. But u may first see that helping someone who is in trouble and helpless is humanity , and most important sunnat of Prophet SAW. There’s is a difference between human and being human. Coming to the real story , Taliban went and threaten Gulab khan that be will pay for his this decision. The other day Taliban suddenly attacked the village and were searching every house for the soldier. When gulag khan heard about that . He himself and took a few men armed with the favourite gun of puktoons klashankoof (A-K 47) sorry for writhing that here biut fact is the fact. Any way gulab went their after the Taliban we’re searching the village , gulab khan told them to stop but the didn’t listen . Gulab khan couldn’t take it anymore. He put i that gun directly on the head the Taliban in charge and told others to go or he will shoot him brains out. They left at that moment but gulab khan knew . Taliban won’t quite. So he shfted that siodier to the near by mountain . The soldier spend a total of 4 days there. 3 in village , 1 in the mountains. The American rescues operation team found him on the fourth day in mountains . This was the words of that soldier. He said when I saw the American uniform in that mountains , after that 4 hard days . that soldier approached and told me buddy don’t worry you’re now safe. He burst intto tears. But that soldier didn’t forgot gulab khan sacrifice for him making atstake his and his family life. He called him to the US and gulag khan spend several days in US. All the family members of his soldier and his mother burst into tears infront of gulab khan and thanked him for saving their loved one life. That soldier now calls gulab khan his brother. But gulab khan faced consequences for his actions. Taliban burned his house and killed his cousins. And he constantly changes his locator because Taliban are In search after him . That American soldier requested American giver merit time give gulab khan and his family visa of US . So he can live his life without fear of death . It’s a real story . If anyone is interested . Check afghan and American brothers documentary on YouTube based on this even and also a Hollywood film LONE SURVIVOR. Is made on this event. This real story I mentioned was not to show that pushtoons are superior or others are inferior but if pushtoons in my view are superior in something is their honesty, bravery , loyalty, the will to stick and want to do something even if it’s the most hard task in the world they do and achieve that task. And most importantly humanity because pashtoons may look hard as a rock from outside but in reality their hearts are soft as cotton.in the end I may say sorry and apologize if someone didnt like my view but there is a saying what all men say Is always true and my view is based on majority of people views. It is to show the real face of pushtoon honour which definitely is not killing and torturing innocent people and women. Write you’re book u will get successful . Best wishes to you. Thanks for giving me opportunity to talk about this important matter.

    Like

  33. Kashmiri says:

    I had 2 best friends, one Pushtun and another Punjabi, with myself being a Kashmiri. We got on like 3 peas in a pod. We’d make jokes about one another but nothing serious in e ssg hat all 3 of us would laugh so much etc. I think people need to get out of this complex and understand that there is so much more to being from a certain place or group etc. I believe the first thing we should all consider ourselves is Pakistani. It’s immature to make offensive jokes and being an adult and still keeping these poisonous ideologies are pretty well, silly. Racism has no bounds, can teach NO love, and can harbour no coexistence. We are all one not just as beings of man kind but according to Islam as we’ll These stereotypes do not and should not define us. We need to challenge and break these paradigms which cast a shadow over our perceptions of each others personalities. Thankfully I’ve seen a large number of Pushtun and punjabi marriages (mostly pushtun men and punjabi women but I have seen it the other way round) and even Pushtun and Kashmiri marriages. As for skin colour and looks goes, which seems to be a pretty hot topic in the comments, let me tell you, I have bright blue eyes, dark brown hair and fair skin. My pushtun friend had beautiful dark skin, black hair and brown eyes and my punjabi friend, fair skin , black hair and brown eyes. Both of them are stunningly beautiful. To judge someone on the basis of their skin with “white” being superior- get a life-you guys who do that look like wanna bes. Remember the words in the Quran are Black, Hazrat Bilal was black and the Kabah is also Black. Furthermore this white skin idolised so much by some, in the west every person who’s fair is seen as “pasty” and spend thousands in tanning products and appointments etc. Color does NOT define how beautiful you are, and if it does well, you have complexes that seriously need to get sorted out. Life is too short to hurt other people and make undue comments and fun about them. In both Punjabi and Pushtun cultures there are MILLION things I both admire and love as is with the rest of our ethnicities, and that’s the way it should be! 🙂

    Like

  34. I come from a big clan. Some of my relatives are high ranking military officials. Nowhere I heard, in my clan at least, any anti Pakistan comment. If there are pukhtun nationalists they can be found I a large afghan refugees who live here. As a matter of fact the general consensus is that they should go back to Afghanistan. If they pledge allegiance to Pakistan then I am in favor of them living their peaceful lives in Pakistan. Those who don’t then certainly they should go back. The other day I complimented a female relative by comparing her to hoor. She had written on her home page: referring to her husband, ” if you want to see an angel, I married one.” I liked her comment so I commented, ” if you want to see a hoor, he married one.” Well, she blasted me, completely misunderstood my compliment. Then I wrote to my nieces and nephews about pukhtuns. I compared them to hornets. They are easily provoked and will sting you promptly. I also wrote that pukhtuns are no more temperamental then our other compatriots. It is that this myth about being temperamental has been falsely branded on us and now we must keep this absurd facad as not to loose face. Later talking to my favorite niece she told me educated pukhtun girls are quick to put some men in their places.
    I am sure I tried to avoid sexist remarks here but I am not sure Orbala will find some, even if there are none.

    Like

    • orbala says:

      Thank you for your comments on my blog; I appreciate it especially when Pukhtuns read what I write.

      About Pakistani Pashtuns and their patriotism to Pakistan, I’ll only say, for now (given the time constraint), that the Pukhtuns I know who are passionately loyal to Pakistan are the ones with little to no understanding of their history. They’re not Afghan refugees, as you seem to believe, and, no, I don’t believe that refugees need to be loyal to the country that hosts them. Afghan refugees in Pakistan, like refugees anywhere, suffer terribly in Pakistan. The Pukhtuns who stand against Pakistan politically are a) those who are aware of the sacrifices that our leaders like Bacha Khan made in vain attempts to liberate Pukhtuns; and those who know their history and the oppressive historical treatments of Pukhtuns in Pakistan, starting particularly with the first massacre that Pakistan committed against a people inside its border upon independence: the Babarra Massacre of August 12, 1948 (and several other such massacres against Pukhtuns by the Pakistani state/military). How any Pukhtun can think Pakistan is worth being loyal to is beyond me. However, I do understand the need for a community, a desire to have a country to call one’s home, and so I can respect the Pakistani Pukhtuns’ tendency and need to be patriotic towards Pakistan. I don’t condemn their loyalty to Pakistan; I understand it, and I am glad that they have some place they can call home, even if it’s rooted in ignorance of their own history and of what’s happening to their language, culture, intellectual and other history inside the borders of Pakistan.

      Like

    • Proud_Pakistani_Pashtun says:

      very well said

      Like

  35. Proud_Pakistani_Pashtun says:

    It worst kind of racism when a person insult you in his/her own language which you cannot understand and you get no clue what they are talking about you. I I like those who say things at your face instead of keeping hatred inside or expressing it in a way that others dont get any idea about their racist thought. I can clearly see from your writing that you are probably Afghan Pashtun who took asylum in Pakistan or you are someone who believe in this shit of loy Afghanistan because you are saying that Pashtun should not be loyal to Pakistan . We have many Afghan traitors in Pakistan who bite the hand who feed them and only such people try to create trouble between different ethnicities of Pakistan by playing this victim card that how pashtuns are suffering in the hands of Punjabi and all this non sense which is far from reality . Such nationalists can only misguide to those uneducated people who never been outside KPK.. little bit joking/teasing of each others is fine for me as long as we are loyal to Pakistan and are united against the enemy of Pakistan but i hate those who hate my country no matter which ethnicity of Pakistan they from. Any proud Pakistani will consider his country before his ethnicity. If you cannot be loyal to Pakistan then give up your citizenship and move to any other country and we will be happy that we got rid of a traitor

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    • orbala says:

      I’m aware of many Pashtun Pakistanis who share your opinion, but I don’t agree with that perspective at all and I think that any Pashtun who knew anything about her/his history would hesitate before claims like “no such thing as Loy Afghanistan.” This, I’m fully certain of. But I don’t expect most Pakistanis to acknowledge their political, social, literary, and all other marginalization in Pakistan because, like other nations, Pakistan provides only a revised, censored version of its history that glorifies it with no recognition of the harms it has caused so many different ethnic groups in Pakistan–all in the name of “unity.”

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    • Proud_Pakistani says:

      Its funny orbala how you label those who dont agree with your nationalist ideas as ignorant about history or their history is distorted because they accept the ground realities instead of day dreaming about Loy Afghanistan. . You think that you are the only sane voice out there who is reading history without any bias and Prejudice. You are asking all ethnicities of Pakistan to get dependence from Pakistan or you just asking Pashtun to leave Pakistan and end up in Loy Afghanistan with farsiwan, Tajiks, uzbek, hazara. Breaking Pakistan and getting loy Afghanistan/Pashtunistan will solve all the problems of Pashtuns etc ? Its disadvantageous for Pashtuns to become independent and from a referendum viewpoint even if the poll was confined to the people of FATA and KPK, the overwhelming majority will vote against independence. If we assume 50% of Pashtuns love this dead concept of Loy Afghanistan, they are still better off having access to Islamabad/Rawalpindi, Lahore and Karachi rather than Kandahar. Do you have slight clue of how many pashtuns living in these cities of Punjab and Sindh? These afghan muhajir even studying and doing business in Punjab/Karachi . On one side they talk about loy Afghanistan and on other side they try to make fake Pakistani Id and passport so that they cannot be deported back to Afghanistan lol

      Tribal Pashtuns should be more open to positive outside influence if Pakistani establishment try to bring FATA into the mainstream through making it a part of KPK. Government can open school but it cannot force tribal people to send their girls in school. you can blame the government only so much when polio vaccination, doctors and various other humanitarians are viewed with contempt by the locals and made to fear for their lives. What was the ethnicity and nationality of those people who murdered 120+ Pakistani school children?

      This all violence, infighting and chasms within the Pashtun community did not suddenly appear with the creation of Pakistan.If you are supporting the creation of states based purely on ethnicity which seem Neo-Nazi view on the world then why do you live in United State a multi cultural country ?Why not move to Qandhar where they speak your precious language and the DNA of the population nigh on matches yours.

      Like

    • orbala says:

      Actually, it is precisely for this sort of mentality–that so many Pakistani Pashtuns think the way you do, speaking of their language in terms of “YOUR language,” etc. and denying it as their own–that I support liberation on ethnic lines. I believe that any ethnic group that is politically, socially, and otherwise marginalized in the nation that has claimed it inside its borders should rise up against that nation and fight for its independence. Is this practice? That’s a different story. Decades ago, it was more practical, but at this point, Pakistan has succeed way too much, unfortunately, in denying Pashtuns access to their history, and that’s why the Pashtun nationalist movement is very weak–and why there are folks like you coming to this blog bashing their own brothers and sisters across the border in Afghanistan. This is how politics work. A nation that tells you nothing good about your history, your leaders, your identity, your contributions to the world/history? Yeah, that nation does not deserve my loyalty.

      If you’re Pashtun, we’ve got the same ancestors (it’s kinda how ethnicity formation works, you see); so, while I’m certain you were trying to patronize me by saying “… the DNA of the population nigh on matches yours,” you’re actually patronizing yourself, too. Bravo! Self-hate never looks good on anyone, and the only people I’ve seen it on, in the context of Pashtuns in/from Pakistan, are those who know virtually nothing about their history except what Pakistani textbooks tell them.

      Like

    • Nangyalay says:

      I guess I know this so called ‘ Proud pakistani Pashtun ‘ ! He claims to be from Mohmand Agency, settled in Mardan and now living in UK ! Why we should leave Pakhtunkhwa: that’s not an option ! Your jinnah was also using British passport and at the same time seeking independence from Britain ! I agree with Orbala that ‘ proud pakistani Pashtun ‘ term deems fake ! I wouldn’t be surprised if he was also admirer of imran niazi’s hair & physique ! But it’s not his fault to flaunt as after all he’s the victim of mashertee aloom ! Hay hay !

      Like

  36. orbala says:

    You’re welcome. Thanks for dropping by and sharing your opinion!

    Like

  37. Pakistani says:

    Tbh I also never liked Pashtuns in the past but with the passage of time I realized that the Pashtuns are not that much bad the way society has shown. Instead they are quite friendly and nice. I personally feel they don’t keep grudges against anyone if someone says bad to them on their face. They finish the matter there&then and then are absolutely OK with that person. (if I am not wrong). We all are Muslims and according to Islam no one is superior to any other person. So we should try to act upon that. We should say that we are Pakistanis instead of saying that we are Pashtuns or Punjabis etc.. And I would like to mention to patriot-Pakistani that all Punjabis are not bad either. I am also a Punjabi but I never thought of my self to be superior than any other person of any other province. I believe everyone is equal. Look everyone has their pros&cons so instead of seeing the cons we should only try to see the pros of each other and try a bit harder to be friendly with each other. And you are right some of the Punjabis do mock Pashtuns but not all so please don’t hate the ones who don’t mock you. And I 100% agree with orbala and I am sorry that if any of my sentence has hurt anyone but I haven’t written it with any bad intentions or to hurt anyone but still I am extremely sorry if anyone is hurt.

    Like

  38. Syed N. Ahmed says:

    While I appreciate Orbala’s views, and I agree that ethnic / cultural groups should not make fun of, mock, ridicule or criticize each other, but at the same time, let’s be honest to ourselves. Many evils do exist in Pakistani society, in all ethnic groups, to a lesser or greater extent. We must recognize these evils & deal with them. Xenophobia, racism, provincialism, tribalism, parochialism, sexism, misogyny, backwardness, lawlessness, and rude, violent or criminal behavior are quite common. Many families don’t want their daughters to get educated, and women do get killed for honor. As a nation, we desperately need to get our act together.
    P.S. I find the remarks about skin color quite funny. I once fell in love with a dark-skinned girl & everyone agreed that she was very beautiful, but she rejected me !

    Like

  39. Orakzai says:

    Dranay Orbalay ! you stole my idea by writing this wonderfully worded and balanced blog. Zama write up ba da day na em expanded way, kho staso wala dair khaista day.

    Baryalai osay.

    Like

  40. Zaffar says:

    I have to share something regarding how many Pashtuns consider all other’s as “Punjabi” and Dark people. However this is not the case with majority pashtuns that i personally know. I am from Gilgit and had an Afghan Pashtun friend on FB. He asked me whether i was a pashtun, and when i said no he was like …”so you must be a Punjabi.” I to him that i was from Gilgit and belonged to a separate ethnicity but he was not convinced. Last year he happened to visit Pakistan and met me. He looked very puzzled and told ” you are definitely a Pashtun, how can you be a Punjabi?”. I got why he was saying that. I am a very light skinned person with brownish hair and most people of my ethnic group are very fair skinned and coloured eyes, brownish/reddish hair is not uncommon among us. Infact i have seen lots and lots of Pashtuns through my life and i can safely conclude that average people in my place are of fairer skintone than average pashtuns. Infact you will hardly come across any darker skinned people among my ethnicity whereas i have seen lots of pashtuns with very brown or even darker skintones. Not that it really matters to me but this is just a fact. Anyways, i became very good friends with this Afghan guy and he later visited gilgit and was amazed at how good the people looked and that how wrong the stereotype of how all non-pashtuns being Dark was. Also i totally agree with how others also stereotype pashtuns. I think if people talk to each other and get to know other people, it erases lot of hate and the wrong notions that people have regarding other people and often leads to great friendships.

    Like

  41. Nadia says:

    I am a Punjabi but so far the Pakhtun who has inspired me greatly is Malala Yousafzai. She is a real brave girl and very well spoken. I think every Pakhtun girl/woman should think like her. She showed Pakhtun girls and women the importance of education, to be independent and have their own identity. She is an inspiration not only for Pakhtun girls but for girls all over Pakistan.

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  42. ghulfaraz khan says:

    Why should pashtuns demanding their rights and correcting colonial misadventures which have divided and supressed them be seen as anti Islam or anti pakistan. The same is true and even worser for Baluchis but Pashtuns have Afghanistan and rich history and cannot remain on the fence indifferent and lazy about their rights and responsibilities. Many pro pak status quo supporting Pashtuns, useless Islamists and Panjabis think such ideas are backward. The question of justice, inalienable rights for all bedevils Pakistan from which it cannot absolve itself.

    Like

  43. Saami says:

    I am pakhtoon from peshawar living in one km to mohmand agency but i hate pashtoon like dogs.
    the pashtoons in forum just know pashtoons by name.
    Reason: i and brother will die for each other but our sons are tarboor basic enemies of each others.
    If you get a lil money and your mama or kaka dont have they will try to make problems and any time they have no money they will act dogs.
    Every consperacy that is plot against you be sure your tarboor will be in it.

    Khafa kegai ma khu pukhtana da sari bachi na dee.

    City pashtoons just go and live in the pashtoon areas then come and have comments.. you are sitting in cities living near guys they are educated and are socialized..

    Kalo ta warshai che khalak de book ki..

    Like

  44. Interesting blog….i think its about time the Pakistan “experiment” ended. Islam cannot be the glue that holds four distinct cultures, customs and languages together. And there is nothing wrong in being a muslim and wanting self determination rights. Same goes for various Indian states. There needs to be 20 odd new countries in the Indian subcontinent. Just look at the fake European Union experiment created after World War II to try best to unite all the countries in the continent with different languages and cultures but its failing miserably with the exit of Britain from EU.

    Like

  45. Salman says:

    These tribal/ethnic/caste/denominational barriers are going to be irrelevant in 40 years. Why you ask? In the cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Islamabad and to a degree Peshawer 20 years ago only the elite married across these lines, now it is the the middle class. In my family alone my Punjabi sister is married to a Pukhtun, my brother is married to a Urdu-speaking Muhajir, my other brother is married to a Punjabi outside of Caste, all this would have been unthinkable 20 years ago. And these are not anomalies, my brother’s Muhajir wife other sister is married to a Kadhmiri. My Pukhtun classmate he is married to a Muhajir, My friend’s Muhajir brother is married to a Pukhtun. We are not ‘the elite’, nor are we Westernized, we are all socially conservative, religious, and place a high emphasis on education.

    What started off as an elite concept has trickled down to the urban middle classes in the ‘Pakistani Alpha Cities’ and I predict will trickle down to the ‘Beta Cities’ (Faisalabad, Hyderabad, Multan, Gujranwala, Sialkot, etc.) then to the ‘Gamma Cities’ (Sukkur, Bahawalpur, Jhelum, etc.). The countryside? I dont know.

    Liked by 1 person

  46. Anna says:

    Awesome, thanks for making it so clear for Non-Pakistani residents!

    Like

  47. Pingback: what’s wrong with fetishizing the “Chai Wala” | Freedom from the Forbidden

  48. rosalindawijks says:

    “When the Pashtun women I know go to some gathering, one of the things they’re best at is mocking Punjabis. “Ew, those Punjabis – they’re ugly as monkeys. For us Pashtuns, the Punjabis are like the blacks of America.” (I’m quoting verbatim (translated from Pashto) from a recent conversation among a couple of Pukhtun women at my house.)”

    Wow. Disgustingly racist against African-Americans & black folks & Punjabi Pakistanis in one move! Staghfirullah, may Allah lead them away from their haram racism.

    Like

  49. I am a Punjabi; frequently visit kpk for my professional work ( I am a consultant). Punjabis are welcome there and I have no problem working there. At the same time, there are perhaps more pashtoons in Lahore than any city of kpk, but no here cares about ethnicity. Pashtoons are well assimilated in Punjab, at least in bigger urban centres. The only interesting thing I find is that people in kpk generally talk about Punjab a lot (even in positive sense) but this is not a popular topic in Punjab. Generally, people in Punjab think high of pashtoons. I did not know color, and height etc are so important to some people. I have seen pashtoons of different colours and heights, and the same is true for other ethnic groups. Anyway good luck to all.

    Like

  50. Behtareen article…
    Thank you so much…
    Tareef kese krun alfaz nhi.

    Like

  51. Farhan says:

    I like the fact that this issue is being discussed, although I’m very disappointed to read some of the things written here. Being Punjabi I’ve mostly had excellent interactions with Pashtun people, except for two assholes who were senior to me in high school- but then again, even the other Pashtuns hated them :-P. Most people that I know from my time in Lahore and Rawalpindi/Islamabad don’t discriminate based on ethnicity – and there are no such “ethnic enclaves” in these cities (except perhaps some refugee camp type area outside Isl). Different circles of friends in school and uni had people from all ethnicities, mostly groups based on interest such as the sporty kids and the nerdy kids.

    I feel bad for those who hold some sort of racist views towards the other, it shows poor upbringing, backwards mentality and low class thinking. I do agree with the author about the portrayal of pushtuns in the media and it really pisses me off (eg the accent, naswar etc). If our society was a little more discerning we would have demanded PEMRA to come down harshly on such portrayals. In the same spirit I would expect my pushtun friends to correct the perceptions and comments of other pushtuns mentioned in the article – it’s the job of the educated to impart modern thinking, even if delivered with a tight slap. We need to get out of this way of thinking of ‘the other’ – racism was used by the Europeans to divide and rule and a branch of science was developed by them specifically for this purpose. The effects are still deeply entrenched and can have devastating outcomes: eg Hutus and Tutsis in Rawanda.

    The only way forward is more interaction and cultural exchange. I would urge all to go and find yourself a friend from the other ethnicity, and really get to know them, their wishes and aspirations. You will be pleasantly surprised 🙂

    The Punjabi-Pashtun compact is what holds our country together and will one day make us the strongest and most prosperous country in South Asia / Middle East region.

    Afghans and Indians are simply afraid of our strength, jealous of our unity and covet our lands. To them I have only this to say: the Punjabi-Pushtun unity fought 2 world wars together, created Pakistan, kicked out the British-Indian army from half of Kashmir, broke the Soviets’ back and is currently holding strong against the Americans as well as against the terror outfits that you’re breeding in Afghanistan! Bow down to our glory and beg for mercy before we really get pissed off at you.

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  52. Raza Hasan says:

    I think humans are prejudiced by nature and will always not like the other group. Keeping such thoughts to oneself and within your house is one thing; sharing it through media with the whole world is another. Jokes about Pashtoons are commonly shown in media which is totally wrong. It needs to stop. As a Pashtoon, I don’t care what others think about me or talk amongst themselves; I hate it when they say it on TV or on the Internet

    Like

  53. Asheer Aslam says:

    Pashtuns enjoyed high respect in non pashtun societies of sub continent as we pashtun were the rulers of their lands. But now situation has changed therefore punjabis’ jealousy coming in tge form of jokes and mockings

    Like

    • umair says:

      Then persians were ruer of ur land what about that….before 500 A.D indians empire were you master,,,,bro think little broad,,,,, every century empires fall and replaces by others… before british now Americans,,,,,we all know persians enpires were greatest of all

      Like

  54. Orbala says:

    LOL. This is such a ridiculous, pitiful, and amusing comment I can’t help but publish it. I wonder how such arrogant and misinformed people manage to stay living…

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  55. Iylah Sharif says:

    Since everyone else is adding their personal experiences I thought I should too. I’m ethnically Punjabi and Pakistani by nationality and very proud of both facts. I’ve grown up in the UK with a diverse mix of Pashtuns, Kashmiris, and Indians. I found that I could relate most to the Punjabi Indians since our culture and traditions are basically the same. I have had many close Pashtun friends and they all have their own interesting take on this matter. My childhood friend considered herself Pakistani and so there were no differences between us and even our families got on very well. When I got older I made friends with another Pashtun and she was from Swat like my childhood friend but she told me she hated Pakistan and wished it never existed. Growing up my family has never said anything rude or derogatory about the Pashtuns, in fact, they used to befriend them so I had never come across this hostility or racism… that was until I met this friend who after getting comfortable with me decided it was OK to voice her hate for Punjabis and Pakistan in general. Naturally, I defended Pakistan and then I began researching why this Pashtun girl had such hate for Pakistanis especially Punjabis. I understand that the government and media higher up are to blame for this animosity but it takes two to tango and I feel that some Pashtuns are harbouring unneeded hate. Whats the point of it? Pashtun children are being taught to continue this cycle of vicious racism but Punjabis are not (at least the Punjabis I know). I do not speak for all of Punjab. We do not mock other Pakistanis or any other nation its just not done. I feel shocked to hear that this racism is still about, how can Pakistan prosper when the different tribes can’t get on. I love my Pashtun friends and btw I had no idea that some Pashtuns disliked being called Pathans so sometimes maybe you should consider the ignorance. Not saying its ok to be ignorant just saying mutual understanding is better than hating each other. We are all Muslims at the end of the day we have more in common than what divides us. Btw I mention this Pashtun friend who hated Pakistanis and Pakistan as a friend because we still are friends. I have had many discussions with her and we choose to respect each other’s cultures and look at the bigger picture that is you cannot blame the many for the faults of a few (government, media higher ups). I hope I never come across this type of racism and hate ever again because in the end who does it help? what does it achieve? The answer is nothing, being good to each other and trying to understand one another will prove much more fruitful in the future.

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  56. Ihtisham Khan says:

    Clearly, you’ve misunderstood what I was trying to say. I can’t help but think your comment is ridiculous, pitiful, and amusing. If my comment is indeed ridiculous, pitiful, and amusing do explain.

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    • Orbala says:

      When someone points out your belief abt the superiority of your race is nonsense & amusing, it doesn’t meant they misunderstood you. Your arrogance has gone so far that you can’t even see that you are too closed-minded to listen to a perspective that challenges your belief. Pukhtuns are NOT in any way better than any other group of ppl in the world. There’s like 70 million Pukhtuns in the world – some are good, some are bad, some are meh, just like in alllll other groups. Or do you want me to list the hundreds of ways Pukhtuns are some of the most racist, most sexist people in the world? (And we’re not alone in this, don’t worry. Other races of humans have terrible & excellent qualities too.)

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    • Ihtishamullah Khan says:

      Since you deleted my comments on the blog, which I requested , figured I send it through here, let me clarify what I initially said, no where iin the world is some group superior, if that’s the case we are all full of arrogance , what I mean by this is that everyone is better in their own ways in what they follow, so my initial response is that we are all better in our own standards or the code of conduct that we may follow , like Puhthunwali, we are not superior than Punjabis nor are they superior than us , yes indeed we are equal because we are humans , and personally , what I am encouraging Pashthuns against racism is to accept it that it exists and do the opposite , encourage good and peace , that’s is my concrete statement, hate does not get us anywhere in life , because hate is a tremendous thing which puts you down , personally , I agree with your blog that racism exists back and forth , and we have to accept that, but I won’t let an outsider try to sabotage our pukhtunwali because what they have against us, we are the minorities in the country so we have to live the racism that exists , and do what is the opposite and encourage peace and prosperity ,

      Sent from my iPhone

      >

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    • Orbala says:

      All cultures have codes like Pukhtunwali, and all of them have serious issues esp when it comes to their views on women.

      But thanks for clarifying.

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    • Ihtishamullah Khan says:

      I agree again , everyone has their issues, but change is not a bad thing , we all need a change , Are you from swat?

      For the record , i never new this blog existed, it’s really fascinating , your writing is phenomenal, I will def donate , Sent from my iPhone

      >

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  57. Asheer Aslam says:

    Strict code like pashtunwali is not present among punjabis. Their life is too uncodified. They accept the culture of everyone who comes to conquer their land. They might convert back to hinduism if india conquered punjab.

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