Freedom from the Forbidden

All things gender and Islam. No bigotry is allowed in this feminist territory. #DeathToPatriarchy

Tag Archive for ‘Islam’

Freedom from the Forbidden (a poem)

The poem and note below were written January 5th 2010; I’m transferring them from the old blog. One of my favorite Pashto songs, written by Ajmal Khattak and sung by Gulzar Alam, goes: Raadak sho zrha isaarawale ye na sham Khula maata kha da kho gandalay ye na sham Rough translation: My complaints and concerns overwhelm my heart; I can no longer keep it in! My mouth is better off […]

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“Forbidden” – a poem

“Forbidden” I have dug inside me, A well – a deep, infinite well. In it lives with me My God The God of both women and men, The God of the oppressed and the liberated, The God of the cursed and the blessed There with me, my feelings dwell, Far from the fondness of human thought, Unwelcome elsewhere The feelings I’m forbidden to relish, The secrets I’m forbidden to reveal, […]

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“In Your Worship, Be Free!” – Except, Don’t Be.

The article below was published first on MuslimGirl.Net and is titled “Why Are Muslim Guys Responding to the ‘Short Shorts’ Article?” The title I’m using in this blog refers to the last line of the Hussain Makke article I’m critiquing below, since it completely contradicts his entire premise even though he’s giving the advice to the rest of us. I love it, though: In your worship, be free. It’s beautiful. […]

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How Not to Respond When You Hear an Imam is Sexually Abusing People

Just to clarify: the title of this post is referring not to survivers of sexual abuse but to those who hear about sexual abuse. The following are some things *not* to say when you learn that a Qur’an teacher, an imam, or other religious community leader is sexually abusing people. The post below is specifically in response to the recent sexual abuse by the Chicago imam, who — let’s all […]

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Yasir Qadhi’s Statement on the Women’s Mosque Is Condescending to Women.

This is a response to Yasir Qadhi’s statement on his Facebook page where he shows fake support for the women’s mosque. The saddest part is that he probably meant well; he was probably expecting a pat on the back, a nice, humble thank-you from Muslim women because he’s basically saying that “Hey, Muslim men! If y’all stop disrespecting women in the mosques, maybe they won’t go around taking matters into […]

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Snake in the Grass

Originally posted on the fatal feminist:
It seems the women’s-only mosque in LA has brought out quite a bit of male panic—and brought out the white knights alike. Most of you have undoubtedly seen what Yasir Qadhi, Abu Eesa’s BFF, has had to say about it: When our sisters are deprived from the right to come to the mosques, or given sub-standard accommodations and treated disrespectfully, it is only natural…

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The Problem with World Hijab Day

Apparently, February 1st is “World Hijab Day.” I don’t support the campaign for many reasons, although I feel it incumbent upon me to say that I fully respect hijabi women and the hijab (and I wear the hijab myself, too, whenever I feel like it); I recognize the struggles that Muslim women–not just hijabis but non-hijabis too–face and these struggles, and Islamophobia more generally, definitely need to be recognized more […]

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Thoughts on the 2014 CAIR Banquet in San Diego

Amusingly patriarchal things happened before, during, and after the CAIR (Council on American-Islamic Relations) banquet in San Diego this past November. Generally speaking–and very, very generally speaking–I can only say that the Muslim community and Muslim leaders have a distressing amount of progress to make in terms of acknowledging women’s voices and concerns. And leadership! You see, The Fatal Feminist (Nahida) and I decided that since we were already in […]

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A Hadith on an “Effeminate” Man

Next time someone dares to tell you that Islam doesn’t recognize the existence of multiple genders and that it’s unnatural for people to behave in a way that everyone else in their gender group seems to behave in, at least in public. A story related in Qushayri’s Risala (trans. Knysh, pg 154): It is related on the authority of Abd al-Wahhab b. Abd al-Majid al-Thaqafi that he said: “Once I […]

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